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Through teaching, research and outreach, ILR generates and shares knowledge to solve human problems, manage and resolve conflict, establish best practices in the workplace and inform government policy.

Research

Global Apparel Supply Chain Factory Workers Walk When Wage Codes Are Violated

Research from Professor Sarosh Kuruvilla shows that factory workers in the global apparel supply chain are more likely to quit over low wages than other poor working conditions.
Garmet workers sewing in a factory
Global Apparel Supply Chain Factory Workers Walk When Wage Codes Are Violated

Strikes, Protests Tracked by Kallas

The ILR Labor Action Tracker led by doctoral student Johnnie Kallas was launched May 1, 2021, and captures data from across the nation.
Strike signs
Strikes, Protests Tracked by Kallas

Little Fish, Big Pond: The Pitfalls of Tracking

Sorting students into classes based on academic performance is common and often contentious, but new research from Assistant Professor Evan Riehl suggests that “students may benefit from tracking.”
A college student sits at a desk while his classmates rush around
Little Fish, Big Pond: The Pitfalls of Tracking

Creating a Creativity Framework

A new paper by Assistant Professor Brian Lucas lays out a framework for how workers undertake the creative process.
Creativity in the workplace
Creating a Creativity Framework

Fixed-Duration Strikes Can Revitalize Labor

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New ILR School research indicates that “fixed-duration” strikes can help unions counteract increasing employer power.
Strike signs
Fixed-Duration Strikes Can Revitalize Labor

Living Wage Study Reveals Racial Disparities

Ian Greer, Ithaca Co-Lab director and other ILR researchers have found that living wage legislation would have a dramatic impact on the earnings of many Black workers in Tompkins County.
A graphic showing how living wage connects to basic needs
Living Wage Study Reveals Racial Disparities

Why test prep for children focuses on math exams

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New research shows that the reason children show more progress on math exams than on English exams partially stems from incentives embedded in the way standardized tests are designed.
two blue pencils on top of a test to be graded through a scanner
Why test prep for children focuses on math exams

Bronfenbrenner Outlines Employer Anti-Union Efforts to Congress

New research advances the study of employer opposition in private and public sector organizing.
Kate Bronfenbrenner headshot
Bronfenbrenner Outlines Employer Anti-Union Efforts to Congress

Manager Movement Impacts Subordinates’ Careers

Bonuses and other incentives decrease for employees left behind, but many seek out opportunities within their organizations, according to research co-authored by ILR Associate Professor JR Keller.
An employee leaving
Manager Movement Impacts Subordinates’ Careers

New York at Work 2022 Published

Research-based data and policy analysis on a range of issues impacting New York’s workers, unions and employers are the focus of the ILR School’s second annual Labor Day report.
New York State Impact
New York at Work 2022 Published

Cost of Living is Biggest Concern for NYS Residents

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The cost of living is the most important issue for residents of New York state, according to the Empire State Poll, conducted by the ILR School between June and August.
A list of monthly expenses
Cost of Living is Biggest Concern for NYS Residents

Workers Can't Always Identify Sexual Harassment

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New research from the ILR School suggests people who work in industries with high levels of sexual harassment have a harder time identifying inappropriate behavior.
A male food service worker improperly touching a female colleague in a commercial kitchen.
Workers Can't Always Identify Sexual Harassment

Worker-Centered Policy Doesn’t Center on All Workers

Assistant Professor Desirée LeClercq argues for more worker voice in U.S. “worker-centered’ trade policies.
A janitor working after hours in an office.
Worker-Centered Policy Doesn’t Center on All Workers

Women Resent Compliments About Communality at Work

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Research from Assistant Professor Devon Proudfoot illustrates that women experience more anger than men when encountering gendered stereotypes - even when the stereotypes are positive.
Businesswoman with shadow of superhero.
Women Resent Compliments About Communality at Work

Investors’ Impact on Health Care Investigated

The financial stability of providers and their ability to serve patients is being threatened by Wall Street, according to new research co-authored by ILR Professor Rose Batt.
The Wall Street bull statue
Investors’ Impact on Health Care Investigated

Fighting For Worker Rights Takes Psychological Toll

New ILR research shows that individual workers who file claims over workplace rights violations suffer emotionally.
Stressed, unhappy girl or woman is under a storm of negative emotions with lightning and rain.
Fighting For Worker Rights Takes Psychological Toll

The Limits of the Platform Economy

Research Professor Ian Greer, M.S. ’03, Ph.D. 05, shows why some industries – specifically live music – do not become part of the platform economy.
Bass guitarist on stage
The Limits of the Platform Economy

Research of Four ILR Professors Featured

The August issue of the ILR Review includes articles co-authored by Adam Seth Litwin, Ian Greer, John McCarthy and JR Keller, exploring a range of work topics.
The cover of the ILR Review
Research of Four ILR Professors Featured

For-Profit Colleges Increase Students’ Debt, Default Risk

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New research from Professor Michael Lovenheim outlines the pitfalls of attending a for-profit college.
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For-Profit Colleges Increase Students’ Debt, Default Risk

The Pitfalls of Variable Work Schedules

ILR doctoral student Hyesook Chung’s new research suggests that variable work scheduling may provide short-term solutions to unpredictable market conditions, but have potential negative impacts on both workers and business performance.
Workers standing in front of a work schedule
The Pitfalls of Variable Work Schedules

Matteson Awarded Academic Venture Fund Grant

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Associate Professor David Matteson, along with researchers from the Dyson School and the College of Architecture, Art, and Planning, has been awarded an AVF grant for the project, “Mapping Poverty, Natural Hazards, and Critical Ecosystem Services for Equitable and Sustainable Development.”
David Matteson Awarded Grant
Matteson Awarded Academic Venture Fund Grant

Overlooked, Undervalued: Cornell Research Seeks to Elevate Home Care Workers

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Professor Ariel Avgar, Ph.D. ’08 is part of an ambitious, multidisciplinary research program aimed at elevating the value of home care workers.
A home health aid and her patient on a telemedicine call
Overlooked, Undervalued: Cornell Research Seeks to Elevate Home Care Workers

Cohesion Drives Union Decision: Bishara Research

Tunisia’s General Labor Union choice to remain neutral illustrates the role of internal cohesion in shaping electoral behavior, according to new research.
Dina Bishara
Cohesion Drives Union Decision: Bishara Research

New Report Analyzes What Workers Really Want

Report, co-authored by Kate Bronfenbrenner and prepared by the Worker Empowerment Research Network (WERN), suggests a need to re-evaluate labor laws and employers’ responses to organization
Illustration of a protest
New Report Analyzes What Workers Really Want

The Power and Gratitude Imbalance

In studying how individuals feel and express gratitude, Assistant Professor Alice Lee has found that power dynamics play a crucial role.
Thank you note with flowers
The Power and Gratitude Imbalance

New Report from Cornell's Labor Leading on Climate Provides Roadmap to Exceed NYC Climate Goals, Create Over 1 Million Jobs

A new report released today by Cornell's Labor Leading on Climate in collaboration with the Climate Jobs NY coalition outlines a comprehensive climate jobs action plan for NYC to fight the climate crisis, make NYC safer and address racial and economic inequity by investing in a pro-worker renewable energy transition.
NYC Skyline
New Report from Cornell's Labor Leading on Climate Provides Roadmap to Exceed NYC Climate Goals, Create Over 1 Million Jobs

Impact of Incentives on Ethics Examined

The presence of incentives directly influences the odds that an individual will act unethically, according to research led by Associate Professor Tae Youn Park.
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Impact of Incentives on Ethics Examined

Calco, Falwell Partner with Public History Fellows

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Through a new program sponsored by the Cornell Public History Initiative in partnership with the Cornell University Library, Steven Calco and Marcie Falwell of the Kheel Center worked with undergraduate fellows.
Steven Calco in the Kheel Center
Calco, Falwell Partner with Public History Fellows

2022 Migrations Awards Include Grant for Worker Institute Faculty on Central American Workers with Temporary Protective Status

The 2022 Migrations Awards include a Justice Futures Team Research Grant awarded to Patricia Campos-Medina and more for their project, “Displaced and Uprooted: Stories of Belonging, Central American TPS Workers' Defiant Struggle for their Right to Stay Home in the U.S.”
Patricia Campos Medina with TPS Worker
2022 Migrations Awards Include Grant for Worker Institute Faculty on Central American Workers with Temporary Protective Status

Global Severance Pay Program Outlined

When apparel factories shut down due to COVID-19, many workers lost their incomes. ILR’s New Conversations Project proposes a model to protect workers.
garment workers in a factory
Global Severance Pay Program Outlined

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